5 Tips When Negotiating For Yourself

In a recent article I mentioned that there are five obstacles to negotiating on your own behalf. We’re inclined to get too emotional and to react to offers personally instead of professionally. Add to this the fact that we’re more likely to spoil the deal with impatience, a lack of objectivity, and inexperience in negotiation encounters, and you bring to life that adage about lawyers that represent themselves in court.

“They have fools for clients,” or so conventional wisdom says.

Despite the fact that negotiating for your own account is tricky and perilous, most of us will be doing quite a lot of it during our lives.

When we walk into car dealerships or call leasing companies, we’re negotiating. When we rent or buy housing, we’re doing the same, whether Realtors are part of the mix, or not.

And anyone who has children can tell you that negotiations with them begin in gestation, when you circumscribe travel plans, dedicate space to your new family members, and select their names.

I happen to be somewhat iconoclastic in believing that negotiating is an acquired taste, it’s something at which we can become connoisseurs, providing we get into the kitchen, roll-up our sleeves, and concoct deals for ourselves.

Here are five tips for mastering the psychology of negotiating on your own behalf:

(1) Do your research. Who is your counterpart? What’s his or her title and latitude of authority? Is this person a peer, a fellow business owner, homeowner, or someone on par with you, or is she a flunky, someone who can say maybe or no, but not yes? If you’re not sure, ask up front. Because you are a PRINCIPAL you’re a heavyweight and you have every right to determine whether the person in the ring with you is in your class.

(2) You don’t have to say yes during the negotiation. Always give yourself an “out,” saying you need to check with your lawyer, your spouse, or even your “team,” back at headquarters, to get their input and feedback. I’ve dealt with CEO’s that do this all the time, and sure enough, they may want to do business with me but they line their ducks up to gum me to death on the details.

(3) Make sure you have viable alternatives in your pocket. Mentioning that you’re going to receive bids from others, or that you need to make a good arrangement or none at all can alert your counterpart to the fact that you’re not NEEDY.

(4) Don’t be worn down by so-called “tiger teams” or negotiating committees. If you’re facing more than a single person at a time, invite them to chat among themselves and then to appoint a single individual, invested with deal making authority, to conduct business.

(5) Set a deadline for each meeting. Tell your counterparts, “I have an hour, so let’s see what we can do.” Deadlines create efficiency and there is pressure to consummate a deal before the sands of time run out.

Most negotiation consultants will tell you that principals tend to make poor negotiators because they care too much about making a deal, not wasting time, and about not offending the other party.

If you look at negotiation as a game, a challenge, and as a fact finding opportunity and learning experience, instead of as a must-win situation, you’ll care, but not too much.

Are you looking for training or guidance with your negotiations, sales, customer service or telemarketing? Contact us for the best-practices in these fields.

Rhodes Holidays – The City Where Past Meets the Present

Rhodes is a city of a rich 2,400 year history – and until the present it has still impressed and captivated the hearts of the many thousand visitors it attracts every year. Its monuments of the medieval past forded within its walls ironically blend harmoniously with the modernity of the tourism today – luxurious hotels and resorts, productive commercial establishments, wide array of tourist activities – making Rhodes a great cheap holidays destination for the holidaymaker.

Rhodes is divided into two parts: the new, or modern city of Rhodes which have the facilities and amenities you would expect of a modern city and the Old Town of Rhodes or the Medieval City of Rhodes which has a maze of streets full of history. You might expect a deserted city with ruins from the past for the Medieval City of Rhodes, but you are actually about to enter Europe’s oldest inhabited medieval town.

It is a busy locality of about 6,000 people who live and work in reality in the buildings where the Knights of St. John did six hundred years ago. Aside from these medieval buildings are mosques, traditional fountains, Gothic and Byzantine churches, oriental motifs of shops and cafes – all forming a very unique and picturesque scene. The town has been inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage City.

Cheap holidays Rhodes [http://www.yourholidays.com/rhodes] provide a tourist many options to enjoy his or her vacation. Simply within its capital he or she is presented with plenty of choices, what more if given the chance to explore the whole island? But Rhodes visitors are winners of well worth, cheap holidays Rhodes even amongst the city of Rhodes itself.

The island has numerous varieties of colors, forms, activities and sightseeing to offer the tourists. From the cloudless skies above the clear blue seas by the soft sandy beaches, to the olive groves by the foothills of the mountains, Rhodes is indeed an island of spectacular views in and out. There are feasts of restaurants, bars and taverns offering traditional and fine local cuisines, and as well as your favorite international food. Night life is definitely alive in the clubs, disco and the famous casino. With everything that is going on in this city of past and present, no wonder why more and more cheap holidays Rhodes seekers come to the island every year.

Why is Chlorine Present in Drinking Water?

Why should chlorine be present in our drinking water? It is for very good reasons, as the treatment and distribution of safe drinking water are considered by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) as one of the major public health achievements of the twentieth century.

Towards the end of the nineteenth century it was found in London, UK, that water from a city well that had spread infectious diseases ceased to be dangerous after having been treated with chlorine.

Then in a few years the practice of water treatment was adopted by most of the civilized world as a means of protecting public health.

Up to those times drinking wine instead of water of dubious quality was the best assurance against illness, for those who could afford the expense.

Disinfecting the drinking water for human and animal use ensures that it becomes free of active microorganisms causing serious and life-threatening diseases, such as cholera and typhoid fever.

Chlorine is effective in killing most pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Chlorine however is not effective in killing certain protozoa like cryptosporidium.

The term chlorine refers to the chemical element Cl that exists as a poisonous yellow gas, irritant of the respiratory tract even at low concentration. As it is a very active element it is found in nature mostly as a compound, of which common table salt, sodium chloride (NaCl) is an example.

Chlorine gas is soluble in water. A common household product, bleach, is a water solution containing about 3 to 6% of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). This product too can be used to disinfect water in case of need.

Additional chlorination effects are the removal of iron and manganese and the residual property of continuing to hinder pathogen reproduction during the long way from the treatment facility to the house tap.

Is it safe to human health to drink chlorinated water?
It depends on whom you ask.

Some studies point to increased risk on health, while others show no additional risk.

It is generally recognized that drinking water chlorination is the process of choice for eliminating most of the life-threatening pathogens possibly present in the water reaching treating plants.

Some research efforts concentrating on the effects of certain by-products of the treatment, seem to suggest that substances like Trihalo-methanes (THM) have the potential to induce cancer in individuals as they do in laboratory animals when supplied at very high levels.

However it is commonly accepted that their presence in treated water in minimal quantities is far from threatening.

EPA regulates how much of these substances are tolerated in chlorinated water for safe use. The current EPA regulations establish a limit of 80 parts per billion (ppb), for THMs based on the annual average of eight distribution system monitoring locations.

Industrial and commercial sources, with deep interests in the use of chlorine and its derivatives, vehemently insist that independent medical sources failed to find statistically relevant results connecting chlorine with development of cancer diseases.

Other sources interpreting more strictly the results of certain research, seem to find concrete demonstration of the dangerous effects on health of chlorinated water.

Until more definitive research will authorize to settle the dispute by defining ways to sort the probable outcome of illness course according to additional contributing factors, it is possibly quite safe to assume that the present official standing of appointed authorities on water quality should be accepted except perhaps in unusual circumstances.

All sources agree that the benefits of chlorination for eliminating the presence of pathogens, are much greater than the minimal risk still remaining, if at all, relative to residual by-products.

The other existing means for obtaining a comparably safe result (ozonation, Ultraviolet light treatment, and use of chlorine compounds like chloramines and chlorine dioxide) are more expensive and do not provide sufficient advantages to promote their substitution.

It is suggested by professional experts that installing a suitable home filter at the point of use removes the nuisance of chlorine and byproducts from the drinking water.